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New Scottish Cervical Screening Campaign

A new campaign has been developed to grab the attention of young women aged 25-35, and start breaking down some barriers to attending.

DON'T IGNORE YOUR NEXT SMEAR INVITE AND IF YOU MISSED YOUR LAST SMEAR TEST, CONTACT YOUR GP PRACTICE TO FIND A TIME THAT SUITS YOU.

BOWEL SCREENING

All men and women aged 50–74 are invited for bowel screening. Bowel screening involves taking a simple test at home every two years.

We strongly encourage you to take this simple test. In Scotland the screening programme will prevent at least 150 deaths from bowel cancer each year

For more info, go to

http://www.nhsinform.co.uk/Screening/bowel

 

SELF CHECK-IN SCREEN

Why not bypass the queue and check yourself in for your appointment when you come to the surgery?  The check in screen is situated in the waiting room and is easy to use.

FAILED APPOINTMENTS

diary

 PLEASE be thoughtful and let us know if you cannot attend as this will allow us to offer the appointment to another patient.

PLEASE NOTE THAT HEPATITIS A VACCINE IS UNAVAILABLE DUE TO A GLOBAL SHORTAGE.

AT PRESENT THE PRACTICE CAN ONLY OFFER DIPHTHERIA, TETANUS & POLIO AND TYPHOID VACCINES IF REQUIRED.

PLEASE VISIT www.fitfortravel.nhs.scot.uk FOR INFORMATION

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Please DO NOT use the contact form on this website to contact us regarding any medical matters. Medical contact should be made by phoning or writing to the Practice. This will ensure that your query will be dealt with appropriately. Thank You!

Change of Address

Please be aware that if you change your address outwith G62 and G64 postcode areas, you will have to register with a GP in your new area.  This includes patients moving to G61

 

X-Ray

doctor examining an x-rayAn X-ray is a widely used diagnostic test to examine the inside of the body. X-rays are a very effective way of detecting problems with bones, such as fractures. They can also often identify problems with soft tissue, such as pneumonia or breast cancer.

If you have a X-ray, you will be asked to lie on a table or stand against a surface so that the part of your body being X-rayed is between the X-ray tube and the photographic plate.

An X-ray is usually carried out by a radiographer, a healthcare professional who specialises in using imaging technology, such as X-rays and ultrasound scanners.

You can find out more about x-ray tests, how they are performed, their function and the risks by visiting the NHS Choices website.

 
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